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Affordable & Permanent Supportive Housing

 A rendering of the 94-unit residential building under construction in the Fruitvale Transit Village.

A rendering of the 94-unit residential building under construction in the Fruitvale Transit Village.

 

Planning for the future

The answer to homelessness is housing. In the past decade, the Bay Area has added one unit of housing for every eight jobs created, and very little of the housing built has been subsidized enough to house low and very low income people. 

Learn how we got to this point.

Housing people who have been homeless for an extended period of time adds additional barriers to re-entry and makes finding stable housing more challenging, expensive and intensive because these individuals and families will need even more help to remain in housing. 

In 2018, Oakland expects to complete 2,284 new units of housing – double the average annual amount. The city also has roughly 12,000 units in the pipeline to be built in future years, which will help alleviate housing demand and reduce housing costs. This is part of the city’s broader 17K/17K plan, which strives to protect 17,000 households from displacement and build 17,000 additional units of market rate, affordable and deeply subsidized housing by 2024. There are affordable housing units currently under construction and abandoned, tax-defaulted, residential vacant properties are being converted into permanently affordable housing for low-and-moderate income residents..

In 2016, Oakland and Alameda County voters passed two housing bonds: Measure KK authorizes $23 million to be spent in Oakland on affordable housing development loans for up to 10 new construction and rehabilitation projects, and preservation loans for up to eight projects. Another $55 million is set aside for Oakland as part of Measure A1, Alameda County’s General Obligation Bond for Housing, which is addressed below.